War pimp alert: Bombing in Algeria linked to Al Qaida, Iran next?

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(CNN) — Two suspected car bombs ripped through the Algerian capital Tuesday, reportedly killing at least 62 people in what appeared to be targeted attacks on government and United Nations buildings.

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Rescue workers walk among damaged cars near the U.N. buildings.

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At least one U.N. worker — a driver for the Algiers office — has been confirmed dead, while another 12 staff members are apparently missing.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has condemned the blasts which he described as “terrorist attacks”, adding the dead included “a number of United Nations staff members.”

Jean Fabre, spokesman for the U.N. Development Program, told CNN a search was under way for the 12 missing staffers.

Algerian Interior Minister Yazid Zerhouni blamed a militant Islamic group, the Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat (GSPC).

The group aims to establish an Islamic state within Algeria. At a news conference, Zerhouni said the Supreme Court and Constitutional Council — hit by one of the two blasts — were known to have been on a list of GSPC targets.

The first bomb detonated near the Constitutional Council’s building in the Algiers neighborhood of Ben Aknoun, according to the state-run Algeria Press Agency.

The second exploded in the middle of the street between two U.N. buildings — the UNHCR offices and the U.N.’s main building — at approximately 9:30 a.m. (3:30 a.m. ET) in the residential area of Hydra, UNHCR spokesman Ron Redmond said.

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Suicide Epidemic Among Veterans

CBS) They are the casualties of wars you don’t often hear about – soldiers who die of self-inflicted wounds. Little is known about the true scope of suicides among those who have served in the military.

But a five-month CBS News investigation discovered data that shows a startling rate of suicide, what some call a hidden epidemic, Chief Investigative Reporter Armen Keteyian reports exclusively.

“I just felt like this silent scream inside of me,” said Jessica Harrell, the sister of a soldier who took his own life.

“I opened up the door and there he was,” recalled Mike Bowman, the father of an Army reservist.

“I saw the hose double looped around his neck,” said Kevin Lucey, another military father.

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Top Air Force Official Dies in Apparent Suicide

So what is going on here? Rumour has it that C.D. Riechters may be involved with the strange events surrounding the “accidental” transport of six live Nukes accross the USA.    

WASHINGTON, Oct. 15 — The second-highest ranking member of the Air Force’s procurement office was found dead of an apparent suicide at his Virginia home Sunday, Air Force and police officials said today.

The official, Charles D. Riechers, 47, came under scrutiny by the Senate Armed Services Committee earlier this month after the Air Force arranged for him to be paid $13,400 a month by a private contractor, Commonwealth Research Institute, while he awaited review from the White House of his appointment as principal deputy assistant secretary for acquisition. He was appointed to the job in January.

The Washington Post reported on Oct. 1 that the contractor, Commonwealth Research, registered as a nonprofit organization in Johnstown, Pa., paid Mr. Riechers for two months as a senior technical adviser, though he did no work for the company.

“I really didn’t do anything for C.R.I.” Mr. Riechers told The Post. “I got a paycheck from them.”

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